ATTACHED TO STUFF

What is it about stuff, that makes us care so much when we lose it? You might think that because our home is just one backpack it would be hard to lose things. At least, that’s what I expected. But no – the list of lost items is continuously growing. A good example is when I left my camera battery and memory card full of pictures in the pocket of my jumper, which I then put in the laundry. Error.

Technically, I didn’t ‘lose’ it. I ruined it. I felt the loss of the pictures taken of the beautiful Bolivian landscapes. I told myself it didn’t matter, that these are only pictures. But still, I couldn’t help myself thinking about it. Worrying. Feeling stupid about my carelessness. But why? I mean, these really are only pictures, right?

If I am honest, I think I started to identify myself with these pictures – and with my stuff in general. When I lose stuff it somehow feels like I am losing a tiny part of myself. As if I change, become less, when I lose an item. I guess the universe is taking items from me to teach me to not be attached to stuff. Maybe that’s why we keep on losing things – it’s a hard lesson to learn!

For what we can still remember, the list of lost or broken items contains: head torch (Bordeaux, France); shirt (Cappadocia, Turkey); socks (Ankara, Turkey); flight bag (Extrema, Brazil); traveller’s water kettle (Buenos Aires, Argentina); sun glasses (Buenos Aires, Argentina); photo camera broke (Bariloche, Argentina); two blocked credit cards (Patagonia, Chile); supersonic ionic toothbrush (Cochabamba, Bolivia); tent (only lost it for three days luckily!) (Trinidad, Bolivia); Fairphone broke (Trinidad, Bolivia); spork broke (Big Sur, USA); IPad cover (found its way back to us after one week) (Luzon, Phillippines); (cord for glasses broke (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia); cap (Chiang Mai, Thailand); sun glasses (Chiang Mai, Thailand); another spork broke (Koh Samui, Thailand); …

The loss of the pictures was -luckily?- just a gentle reminder; both battery and memory card with pictures did survive the washing machine.

(K)

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